Open Login Screen

Boswellia serrata

176.png
Boswellia serrata is a plant widely grown in India. It belongs to the family Burseraceae, found in dry hills of the Indian states of Madhya Pradesh, Bihar and Gujarat. Boswellia serrata is a moderate-to-large branching tree growing to a height of 12 feet found in India, Northern Africa, and the Middle East. Strips of Boswellia bark are peeled away, yielding a gummy oleo-resin.
Favoured:
0

Listing Details

Botanical Names
Boswellia serrata
Indian Names
Sanskrit : Kunduru Bengali : Luban, Salai Gujarati : Sarfal, Dhupelio, Dhupedo, Saledu Hindi : Salai, Saler, Salga, Salhe, Sali Malayalam : Kungiliam, Chitinti Marathi : Salai Kannada : Tadiku, Tadkingid, Anebyal Tamil : Kudrunkam gugulu, kundrikam, kungli, morada, Telugu : Parangisambrani
Chemical Constituents
Major constituents of Boswellia serrata include -Thujene, P-cymene, -pinene, limonene, linalool, terpineol, methylchavicol, terpinylacetate, Cadinene, geraniol and elemol from essential oil. Gum resins of Boswellia includes Arabinose, Rhamnose, Glucose, Galactose, Fructose, Digitoxose, Glucuronic acid, galactaronic acid and serratol from gum resins are also present.
Pesticide Limits
A limit for pesticide is one of the major issues in standardization of medicinal plants and products in view of the worldwide widespread use of pesticides in cultivated plants. The presence of pesticides in extracts increase the health risk by many folds. The pesticides can be extremely irritant on skin as well as in the internal organs, it is essential to monitor its concentration as a part of GMP. Various analytical methods for the quantitative determination of pesticides by gas chromatography coupled with mass-spectrophotometer are in use. Konark Research Foundation (KRF), a NABL certified lab is well equipped with the latest technology and instruments and monitors the pesticide limit as part of its GMP.
Chromatographic Profile
From the pharmacopoeial perspective, a better quality control of raw material can be achieved by specifying a quantitative test procedure for the determination of the range or a minimum content by specifying a quantitative test procedure for the determination of the range or a minimum content of the marker substances or the ‘active’ ingredient. A chromatographic finger profile represents qualitative/ quantitative determination of various components present in a complex plant extract irrespective whether or not their exact identity is known. Thin layer chromatographic technique is the simplest and least expensive method that provides plenty of information on the composition of raw herbs and its preparation. For quantitative analysis of active ingredients or marker substances with simultaneous separation and detection High Pressure liquid chromatography is the best technique. We use the latest model of HPLC for all its analysis.
Limits of Impurities
A test requirement for foreign organic matter would ensure the extent of contamination of extraneous matters such as filth and other parts of botanicals not covered by the definition of the herbal drug.Since sand and soil are predictable contaminants of botanicals, test requirements for ‘total ash’, water soluble ash’, ‘acid soluble ash’, residue on ignition and sulphated ash would be expected to limit such contaminants.Test requirement for heavy metals in botanical raw material are probably more relevant for parts of plants growing under ground than for the aerial parts of the plant. The presence of high levels of minerals interacts with the final product there by affecting its keeping quality.
Microbial Limits
If the raw herb is to be used directly without boiling in water prior to consumption, restrictive limits on microbial contaminants are required for pathogens such as Salmonella sp. Enterobacter and E.coli which are causative agent for various gastro-intestinal diseases. A lower level of yeasts and molds and a limit on total aerobes are considered appropriate in plant material for topical use. The presence of aflatoxins detected by chemical means is generally independent of the number of viable molds that are detected using microbiological methods. Aflatoxins in microgram quantity are capable of giving serious hypersentivity reactions which can be extremely harmful to human health.
Pharmacology
In Ayurvedic medicine Boswellia serrata has been used for hundreds of years for treating arthritis. The therapeutic value of its gum has been known. It possesses good anti-inflammatory, anti-arthritic and analgesic activity. Extracts of Boswellia serrata have been clinically studied for osteoarthritis and joint function, particularly for osteoarthritis of the knee. Positive effects of Boswellia in some chronic inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, bronchial asthma, osteoarthritis, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease have been reported. Boswellia has potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects that can reduce the pain and inflammation of joints. Boswellic acid, an extract from Boswellia serrata, has been studied for anti-neoplastic activity, especially in experimental primary and secondary brain tumors, indicating potential efficacy from in vitro and limited clinical research.
Health Benefits
Boswellia serrata gum resin has been reported to have analgesic, anti arthritic, anti inflammatory and anti-pyretic activity. The gum resin is used in rheumatic disorders and nervous diseases. The oil obtained from the resin is used to treat skin disorders and as anti fungal agent. The extract of gum resin has been demonstrated to possess anti bacterial and anti inflammatory activity.
Research References
• www.pubmed.gov Pubmed, a wellknown site has listed important studies going on around the world in various universities. These include….. 1. Complexation with phosphatidyl choline as a strategy for absorption enhancement of Boswellic acid.(Sharma A, Gupta NK, Dixit VK.Drug Deliv. 2010 Jul 12. [Epub ahead of print]PMID: 20624027). 2. Topical Boswellic acids for treatment of photoaged skin.(Calzavara-Pinton P, Zane C, Facchinetti E, Capezzera R, Pedretti A.Dermatol Ther. 2010 Jan-Feb;23 Suppl 1:S28-32.PMID: 20136919). 3. Boswellia resin: from religious ceremonies to medical uses; a review of in-vitro, in-vivo and clinical trials.(Moussaieff A, Mechoulam R.J Pharm Pharmacol. 2009 Oct; 61(10):1281-93. Review.PMID: 19814859). 4. In vivo genotoxicity evaluation of a plant based antiarthritic and anticancer therapeutic agent Boswelic acids in rodents.Sharma R, Singh S, Singh GD, Khajuria A, Sidiq T, Singh SK, Chashoo G, Pagoch SS, Kaul A, Saxena AK, Johri RK, Taneja SC.Phytomedicine. 2009 Dec; 16(12):1112-8. Epub 2009 Aug 12.PMID: 19679457). 5. Complementary therapies, herbs, and other OTC agents: Boswellia (Boswellia serrata).(Cassileth B.Oncology (Williston Park). 2009 Nov 15;23(12):1108. No abstract available. PMID: 20017295). 6. Boswellia frereana (frankincense) suppresses cytokine-induced matrix metalloproteinase expression and production of pro-inflammatory molecules in articular cartilage.(Blain EJ, Ali AY, Duance VC.Phytother Res. 2010 Jun; 24(6):905-12.PMID: 19943332). 7. Boswellia resin: from religious ceremonies to medical uses; a review of in-vitro, in-vivo and clinical trials.(Moussaieff A, Mechoulam R.J Pharm Pharmacol. 2009 Oct;61(10):1281-93. Review.PMID: 19814859). 8. In vivo genotoxicity evaluation of a plant based antiarthritic and anticancer therapeutic agent Boswelic acids in rodents.(Sharma R, Singh S, Singh GD, Khajuria A, Sidiq T, Singh SK, Chashoo G, Pagoch SS, Kaul A, Saxena AK, Johri RK, Taneja SC.Phytomedicine. 2009 Dec;16(12):1112-8. Epub 2009 Aug 12.PMID: 19679457). 9. LY294002 enhances boswellic acid-induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells.(Liu JJ, Duan RD.Anticancer Res. 2009 Aug;29(8):2987-91.PMID: 19661305). 10. Identification of human cathepsin G as a functional target of boswellic acids from the anti-inflammatory remedy frankincense.(Tausch L, Henkel A, Siemoneit U, Poeckel D, Kather N, Franke L, Hofmann B, Schneider G, Angioni C, Geisslinger G, Skarke C, Holtmeier W, Beckhaus T, Karas M, Jauch J, Werz O.J Immunol. 2009 Sep 1;183(5):3433-42. Epub 2009 Jul 31.PMID: 19648270). 11. Activation of p53/p21/PUMA alliance and disruption of PI-3/Akt in multimodal targeting of apoptotic signaling cascades in cervical cancer cells by a pentacyclic triterpenediol from Boswellia serrata.(Bhushan S, Malik F, Kumar A, Isher HK, Kaur IP, Taneja SC, Singh J.Mol Carcinog. 2009 Dec;48(12):1093-108.PMID: 19544329 ). 12. Frankincense oil derived from Boswellia carteri induces tumor cell specific cytotoxicity.(Frank MB, Yang Q, Osban J, Azzarello JT, Saban MR, Saban R, Ashley RA, Welter JC, Fung KM, Lin HK.BMC Complement Altern Med. 2009 Mar 18;9:6.PMID: 19296830). 13. In vitro anti-biofilm activity of Boswellia spp. oleogum resin essential oils.(Schillaci D, Arizza V, Dayton T, Camarda L, Di Stefano V.Lett Appl Microbiol. 2008 Nov; 47(5):433-8.PMID: 19146534). 14. Temporary anti-cancer & anti-pain effects of mechanical stimulation of any one of 3 front teeth (1st incisor, 2nd incisor, & canine) of right & left side of upper & lower jaws and their possible mechanism, & relatively long term disappearance of pain & cancer parameters by one optimal dose of DHEA, Astragalus, Boswellia Serrata, often with press needle stimulation of True ST. 36.(Omura Y, Horiuchi N, Jones MK, Lu DP, Shimotsuura Y, Duvvi H, Pallos A, Ohki M, Suetsugu A.Acupunct Electrother Res. 2009;34(3-4):175-203.PMID: 20344885). 15. Bosellia serrata-induced apoptosis is related with ER stress and calcium release.(Kim HR, Kim MS, Kwon DY, Chae SW, Chae HJ.Genes Nutr. 2008 Feb;2(4):371-4.PMID: 18850233). 16. Phytochemical analysis of the essential oil from botanically certified oleogum resin of Boswellia sacra (Omani Luban).(Al-Harrasi A, Al-Saidi S.Molecules. 2008 Sep 16;13(9):2181-9.PMID: 18830149).
Attachment